Weekend Stories

A visual diary and stories, (mostly) captured on weekends.

The weekend is the time, when we wish to be absolutely least responsible.

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Roman legacy in Cologne

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I recently visited the Roman-Germanic Museum in Cologne, that exhibits archeological finds from the Roman and Germanic era in Cologne and the surrounding area. While strolling through the exhibition, I was fascinated by the acute presence of the artifacts on display and the stories behind them. Of course, I’m aware of Cologne’s Roman heritage, but every visit to the museum makes me even more aware of the Roman influence on Cologne’s culture and identity.

Chinese scholar’s rocks

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The Museum of East Asian Art in Cologne is currently hosting an enlightening exhibition on Chinese scholar’s rocks, also known as gōngshí. The exhibition features a wide range of rocks from renowned regions such as Yingde in Guangdong, Liuyang in Hunan, and Lake Tai in Jiangsu. The rocks are displayed alongside other objects such as writing brushes, ink stones, and porcelain vessels. It provides a fascinating insight into the history and culture of Chinese scholar’s rocks and their significance in Chinese art and literature.

From Qingdao to Cologne: 50 Masterpieces of East Asian art

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The Oriental Endowment for the Promotion of East Asian Art in Cologne celebrates its 50th anniversary with a remarkable exhibition of 50 masterpieces of East Asian art. The exhibition is running at the Museum of East Asian Art and has now been extended until the end of September 2024. It’s a great opportunity to see some of the most beautiful pieces of East Asian art, covering a wide range of art forms, including ceramics, bronzes, paintings, and sculptures from China, Japan, and Korea. The pieces are drawn from the museum’s collection, which was founded by Hans-Wilhelm Siegel, a businessman, patron and collector of East Asian art.

May 2024

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Snaps from May 2024, including a visit to St. Maria im Kapitol, the Museum for East Asian Art, and a trip to Mainz.

From Gothic to Zen: Comparing medieval Western and Eastern wooden sculptures

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The art of wood sculpture, prevalent in both medieval Europe and East Asia, offers a fascinating study in contrasts and similarities. While both regions developed rich traditions in wood carving, their cultural, religious, and artistic trajectories shaped distinct styles and themes. Here is a brief comparison of selected medieval European and East Asian wooden sculptures.

Silent narrators: Medieval wood sculptures

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During my recent visits to churches and medieval museums, I was impressed by the remarkable craftsmanship and artistic expression of wooden sculptures. These sculptures, primarily driven by religious themes, offer a unique window into the medieval mind, its craftsmanship, and its spiritual quests. Here are some shots of my favorite wood sculptures that I captured during my last visits to the Museum Schnütgen and other places in Cologne.

The Bright Age: The vibrant colors of medieval Christian art

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The term ‘Dark Ages’, often used to describe the medieval period, conjures images of a grim, colorless world, shrouded in piety and the ultimate fear of God. However, this portrayal is a far cry from the reality of medieval life, especially when it comes to art. During a recent visit to the Wallraf-Richartz Museum in Cologne, I was struck by the vibrant colors, the richness of detail and imagination, and the criticism of secular and clerical authority often inherent in medieval Christian imagery. Here are some of my favorite artworks, hopefully shedding some light on a common misconception.

April 2024

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Snaps from April 2024, including this year’s cherry blossom, a visit to the Cologne City Museum, which just reopened in March this year, a trip to Remagen and to Maria Laach.

Faith and commerce: The medieval relic trade in Cologne

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During my last visit to the Schnütgen Museum, I noticed a series of elaborate reliquary busts. These intricately crafted artifacts were shaped like the upper bodies of figures meant to represent saints, kings, and queens. Each bust had an opening to enclose and hold the corresponding relic. Their skillful artistry was immediately striking. Intrigued by this encounter, I began to do some research, uncovering a fascinating yet ironic chapter in the history of Cologne.

Beyond the sacred: Exploring medieval art at the Schnütgen Museum

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For me, a visit to the Schnütgen Museum is always both refreshing and enlightening. Situated in the heart of Cologne, the museum offers a unique blend of local and European religious art and cultural heritage, presented in a secular, yet respectful light. It enables visitors to appreciate the artworks as individual pieces of art, detached from their original religious context.

1700 years of Jewish history in Cologne

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A perhaps not well perceived part of Cologne’s history is its rich Jewish heritage that dates back to the Roman era. The Cologne Jewish community is considered as one of the oldest North of the Alps and has a long and complex history, marked by periods of prosperity and persecution. The community has contributed significantly to the city’s cultural and economic development. Here is a short overview of that history.

Kölsch – Rethinking a local myth

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In Cologne, one tradition distinctly captures the essence of the city more than any other: Kölsch. This clear, top-fermented beer is celebrated not just as a local specialty but as a vital part of the city’s heritage and a symbol of communal spirit. Its role in social gatherings and public life marks it as a cornerstone of Cologne’s cultural fabric. Yet, amidst its widespread acclaim, it’s crucial to remember that Kölsch is an alcoholic beverage. This fact prompts a necessary reevaluation of its place within Cologne’s culture and invites us to ponder the real foundations of a social community. It’s time to consider the implications of glorifying an alcoholic tradition and to explore what truly makes a community thrive.

The Richmodis legend – A Cologne tale

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High above the Neumarkt in Cologne, two horse heads protrude from the side of a tower, sparking curiosity and wonder among both locals and visitors. These sculptures are not mere decorations but symbols of one of Cologne’s most intriguing legends—the tale of Richmodis. Here is a summary of some facts that I could gather about this local legend.

March 2024

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Snaps from March 2024, including the first trip to Ahrweiler after the great flood in 2021.

Jan von Werth: A Cologne love story

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The rich folklore of Cologne holds another captivating tale: The legend of Jan von Werth and Griet. A story that combines romance, valor, and enduring spirit. The legend tells the tale of a simple soldier who rose to prominence through his bravery, only to find his heart captured by the love of a woman who initially spurned him. With it’s tragic-pointed end, the story could be considered as Cologne’s own Romeo and Juliet, even though being less famous than the Shakespearean tragedy.

Tünnes and Schäl: Two Cologne icons

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In Cologne, few characters are as beloved and emblematic as Tünnes and Schäl. These two figures represent the quintessential ‘Kölsch’ spirit (Cologne’s local dialect and culture), combining humor, wit, and a touch of wisdom.

The Heinzelmännchen: Secret shadow workers of Cologne

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Here is another snippet from the long list of Cologne legends: The Heinzelmännchen. The Heinzelmännchen are a legendary group of house gnomes or elves who, according to the legend, performed domestic chores and crafts in the city of Cologne during the night, leaving the inhabitants to wake up to a clean and orderly city.

Nubbelverbrennung – Another Cologne Carnival tradition

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After exploring the Roman origins of the Cologne Carnival and the “Geisterzug”, I realized I had nearly overlooked another pivotal local tradition: The “Nubbelverbrennung”. The “Nubbel” is a straw puppet that is hung up and burned down at the corner of a street or a pub on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday. It serves as a symbolic purification of the sins and mischiefs that have happened during the carnival.

Origins of Cologne’s coat of arms

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Did you ever wonder about the coat of arms of Cologne and why it is the way it is? I just did some research and found out that its history is quite interesting and also includes some funny twists.

Halve Hahn: A special dish in Cologne

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If you’re currently out enjoying the Cologne carnival, you might encounter a local specialty that can cause some confusion: The ‘Halve Hahn’. Don’t be misled – this dish isn’t poultry.

February 2024

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Snaps from February 2024, including the participation in the Geisterzug during the Cologne Carnival, a Saturday walk through Cologne, and the participation in the demonstration on the second anniversary of the Russian invasion of Ukraine (Roncalliplatz, Cologne).

Geisterzug: The alternative Carnival in Cologne

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After exploring the Roman origins of the Cologne Carnival, we will now take a look at the alternative carnival event in Cologne called ‘Geisterzug’ (lit. ‘Ghost Parade’). It is actually a more recent addition to the Cologne Carnival tradition, starting in 1991, and can be seen as a protest against the commercialization of the today’s Cologne Carnival.

Roman origins of the Cologne Carnival

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As the clock strikes 11:11 AM tomorrow, the so-called ‘Fifth Season’ begins in Cologne. The city is overrun with revelers, and the streets are bustling with people. The citizens of Cologne celebrate with unrestrained joy and, notably, a fair amount of alcohol. But where does Carnival actually come from? What are its origins, and how has it evolved over time? This post takes you on a brief journey through the history of the Cologne Carnival to shed light on the cultural background of the festival, which tends to be forgotten in today’s thoroughly commercialized carnival.

A Zen-Buddhist interpretation of the ‘Kölsches Grundgesetz’

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Zen op Kölsch – I recently discovered a small booklet by Michael Wittschier, who interpreted the so-called ‘Kölsches Grundgesetz’ in a Taoist way. Taoism is a philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Dào, a term that can be translated as ‘the way’, ‘the path’, or ‘the way of nature’. Wittschier’s interpretation is a very interesting read and I couldn’t resist to buy the booklet. However, I also thought that it would by an interesting experiment to interpret the ‘Kölsches Grundgesetz’ in a Zen-Buddhist way. So, here we go.

Stumbling upon history: The Stolpersteine project and its role in remembering Nazi victims

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In European and particularly German cities, you may encounter brass plaques, known as ‘Stolpersteine’ or ‘stumbling stones’, embedded in pavements in front of buildings. Inscribed with names and dates, these plaques memorialize victims of the Nazi regime at their last known addresses, serving as a poignant reminder of the individual lives lost during this dark period in Germany and our collective history and responsibility.

NS DOK El-De Haus: Retracing the steps of Nazi history in Cologne

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I recently visited the El-De Haus in Cologne, a former center of the Gestapo and now the NS Documentation Centre of Cologne, which left a profound impression on me. The house is not like other museums; it is a storyteller of a dark chapter in Cologne’s history and a stark reminder of the horrors that totalitarian regimes can inflict. What I liked most is that the documentation center focuses on the story of victims and the resistance to the Nazi regime, giving them much more space than the perpetrators. Here is a summary of the exhibition, coupled with my personal reflections.

Christian ivory carvings and their comparison with Japanese netsuke: A cross-cultural analysis

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Recently, I had the opportunity to visit a netsuke exhibition. The exhibition was amazing! While strolling through the exhibition, I also noticed a similarity with European Christian ivory carvings. Japanese netsuke and Christian ivory carvings both have their roots in the meticulous art of ivory carving. However, they differ considerably in purpose, symbolism and stylistic expression. Unfortunately, there was no exhibition about the latter that I could have visited at the same time or before. So I searched through my photo archives and put together some examples of European ivory carvings here.

January 2024

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Snaps from January 2024, including a visit to the Museum Ludwig, the Rautenstrauch-Joest Museum, the Schnütgen Museum, the El-De Haus, the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, and the Cologne Cathedral. In mid-January, something really rare happened: It snowed in Cologne. The city was covered in a white blanket, and I took the opportunity to take some pictures of the snow-covered city. We also participated in one of the many demonstrations that spontaneously sprung up across Germany at the end of the month against far-right movements and the far-right AfD party. There were 70,000 participants in Cologne alone.

The Ruhr Museum: A Journey through the cultural heritage of the Ruhrgebiet

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During a recent visit to the Ruhr Museum in Essen, I discovered not just an outstanding modern museum, but also a gateway to the rich history of the Ruhr area, also known as the ‘Ruhrpott’. This museum visit opened my eyes to the depth and complexity of the Ruhr region’s past and present.

Helena Parada Kim’s ‘Interstices’ - A fusion of cultures and traditions

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Helena Parada Kim’s ‘Interstices’ at the Museum of East Asian Art in Cologne masterfully blends Korean traditions with European artistry, creating a dialogue between past and present. Her unique approach to cultural fusion is exemplified in works that juxtapose traditional Korean motifs with contemporary European painting techniques, offering a fresh perspective on cultural identity and arts in general.

Netsuke – The elegance of Japanese craftsmanship

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The Museum of East Asian Art in Cologne is currently hosting the exhibition ‘Kyōto’s Netsuke - Masters & Myths’ to celebrate the 60-year partnership between Cologne and Kyōto. The exhibition showcases an extraordinary selection of netsuke from the Kyōto school, each piece embodying the exceptional Japanese craftsmanship and celebrating the long-standing friendship between the two cities.

December 2023

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Snaps from December 2023, including a visit to the Museum for East Asian Art in Cologne, the Ruhrmuseum in Essen, and the New Year’s Eve celebrations in Cologne.

November 2023

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Snaps from November 2023, mostly from the Eifel region.

October 2023

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Snaps from October 2023, including a trip to the Japanese Gardenꜛ and an ikebana exhibitionꜛ in Leverkusen, a visit to the Apollinaris Church in Remagen, a rugby match of the Cologne Crushersꜛ, a trip to Linz on the Rhine, and a visit to the Cologne Fair.

The Three Worlds

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The royal illuminated manuscript ‘Traiphum’ from Bangkok, 1776, depicts the tripartite Buddhist cosmos and is a testament to King Takin’s reign after the fall of Ayutthaya. Luckily, I had the chance to see it at the Humboldt Forum in Berlin.

The Tale of Prince Vishvantara

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During my recent visit to the Humboldt Forum, I came across a captivating image from a series that dates back to 1837, illustrating the life of Prince Vishvantara. This prince’s life, emblematic of unparalleled generosity, is a celebrated narrative in Buddhism, annually honored in various Southeast Asian festivals.

Exploring the Alte Nationalgalerie

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Berlin’s Alte Nationalgalerie houses a vast collection of 19th century paintings and sculptures. The building itself is a work of art, and the collection is a great opportunity to discover the history of art in Germany. Here are some snapshots of my recent visit.

Exploring the Renaissance at the Bode Museum

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While the Bode Museum’s medieval collection invites introspection into the raw spiritual expressions of the Gothic era, its Renaissance collection beckons with a different allure. Here are some impressions I collected during my latest visit.

The Bode Museum: A new lens on medieval art

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At the heart of Berlin’s Museum Island, the Bode Museum offers a unique opportunity to engage with Christian art. The museum’s collection of medieval art, in particular, provides an intriguing opportunity to explore these artifacts outside of their traditional religious context.

The three perfections: Chinese artistic tradition

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In the rich Chinese cultural history, three art forms stand out as pillars of classical education and self-expression: poetry, calligraphy, and painting. Collectively, they are known as ‘The Three Perfections’, representing the culmination of Chinese artistic tradition.

Korean ceramics: Spirituality through simplicity and purity

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Korean ceramics embody a serene beauty born from simplicity, clarity, and an embrace of natural imperfections. The Humboldt Museum showcases this centuries-old tradition, offering a reflective journey into Korea’s unique interpretation of art, nature, and spirituality.

The many faces of the Buddha

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The Humboldt Forum in Berlin holds an extensive collection of Buddha and Bodhisattva sculptures from all over Southeast Asia: China, Japan, Thailand, Cambodia, Tibet, Nepal. In this post, I’d like to show the many faces of Buddhist sculptures that I have discovered in the Forum.

The Kizil Caves

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The Kizil Caves are a set of Buddhist rock-cut caves situated near Kizil, Xinjiang, China. Historically significant and renowned for their intricate murals, these caves offer a fascinating glimpse into the rich murals and sculptures of Buddhism in China and Central Asia. Artifacts recovered from the caves are displayed alongside fragments of the murals at the Humboldt Forum in Berlin.

Buddhist clay tablets from Myanmar

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Another quite interesting finding I made at the Humboldt Forum were some Buddhist clay tablets from Myanmar. I was impressed by the similarities with Christian panels depicting scenes from the life of Jesus, biblical events, or saints – another example of the universality of artistic expressions across diverse cultural traditions.

Gandhara-style Buddhist sculptures

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This post ties directly into my previous on The first plastic depictions of Buddha’s life: Gandhara reliefs at the Humboldt Forum, Berlin. In this post, I showcase further, quite impressive Gandhara-style Buddhist sculptures also seen at the Humboldt Museum in Berlin.

The first plastic depictions of Buddha’s life: Gandhara reliefs at the Humboldt Forum, Berlin

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On my visit to the Museum of Asian Art at the Humboldt Forum in Berlin, I was captivated by 15 stone reliefs depicting the Buddha’s life. Crafted in Gandhara between the 1st and 3rd century, these reliefs are among the earliest narrative representations of the Buddha. Gandhara was more than just a region; it was a melting pot of civilizations, playing an indispensable part in shaping the visual language of Buddhism.

East and West: Finding common grounds in distinct artistic traditions

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I recently visited the Museum of East Asian Art and the Museum Schnütgen for European Medieval Art, both in Cologne. Having explored these museums in quick succession, I was struck by both the contrasts and surprising parallels in the artistic expressions of East and West.

September 2023

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Snaps from September 2023, including a trip to Berlin (Bernstein Conference at the Humboldt University) with visits to the Museum for Asian Art in the Humboldt Forum, the Bode Museum, the Berlin Cathedral, the c/o Berlin, and the Alte Nationalgalerie.

Embracing imperfections: Kintsugi and the story of my teapot

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Kintsugi, the traditional Japanese art of ‘golden joinery’, celebrates the beauty of brokenness. My experience with a cherished teapot taught me not just about repair, but about embracing imperfections and celebrating the breakage and repair as an integral part of an object’s history.

August 2023

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Snaps from August 2023, including shots of my new tea ceramics, a visit to the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, Museum für Ostasiatische Kunst, and Schnütgen Museum (all in Cologne).

July 2023

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Snaps from July 2023, including a trip to Berlin (Glia Conference) with visits to the James-Simon-Galerie (with a special exhibition on ‘Archaeological treasures from Uzbekistan’), a trip to Bad Breisig and the Botanical Garden (‘Flora’) in Cologne.

June 2023

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Snaps from June 2023 (summer in Cologne).                  

May 2023

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Snaps from May 2023, straying around in Cologne and at Maria Laach.

April 2023

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Snaps from April 2023, including a visit to the fair in Cologne, and a trip to the Eifel (‘Bunte Kuh’), including snaps of this year’s cherry blossom in the Eifel region.

March 2023

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Snaps from March 2023, including a visit to Maria Laach and Göttingen (Göttingen Meeting of the German Neuroscience Society).

February 2023

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Snaps from February 2023, straying around in Cologne, and trips to Wuppertal, the Eifel, the Cologne Wholesale Market, and a visit to the Schnütgen Museum in Cologne.

January 2023

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Snaps from January 2023, including a visit to the Museum for East Asian Art in Cologne.

December 2022

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Snaps from December 2022, including a visit to the Museum Küppersmühle in Duisburg and the New Year’s Eve in Cologne.

November 2022

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Snaps from November 2022, straying around in the Eifel.

October 2022

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Snaps from October 2022 (road trip to the Eifel).  

September 2022

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Snaps from September 2022, including a trip to the Eifel and Berlin (Bernstein Conference at the TU Berlin) with visits to the Altes Museum and the Bode Museum.

August 2022

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Snaps from August 2022, including a visit to the Rautenstrauch-Joest Museum, Schnütgen Museum and Römisch-Germanisches Museum (currently located at the Belgisches Haus) in Cologne.

July 2022 (2)

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The last chunk from July 2022, with a trip to the Eifel and a visit to the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne.

July 2022

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Snaps from the Cologne Pride Parade 2022 and a trip to Paris (FENS Forum) including visits to the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Musée Guimet, the Musée d’Orsay, and the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle.

June 2022

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Straying around in June in Cologne.                              

May 2022

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Straying around in May (Cologne, Eifel, and Bergisches Land).

April 2022

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Straying around in April (Cologne, Andernach, Bad Breisig, and Aachen, including snaps of this year’s cherry blossom in Cologne).

March 2022

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Straying around in March (Maria Laach and Cologne, including a visit to the Museum for East Asian Art).

February 2022

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Straying around in February 2022 (Rodder Maar in the Eifel region).

January 2022

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Snaps from January 2022 (straying around in Cologne, including a visit to the new city archive).

Happy New Year 2022!

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The New Year’s Eve 2021.                                                    

Late Summer to Winter 2021

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Random snaps from late summer to winter 2021.          

Ukiyo-e exhibition (Oct, 2021)

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Snaps from a ukiyo-e exhibition at the Museum for East Asian Art in Cologne.

A Saturday (Oct, 2021)

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A Saturday in October.                                                        

The (un)lost place (Aug, 2021)

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Playing around in a former industrial complex.        

A trip to Dortmund (Aug, 2021)

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Snaps from a day-trip to Dortmund in August 2021.  

A day at the garden center

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A visit to the garden center ‘Dingers’ in Cologne.

Museum Ludwig (Aug, 2021)

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Visiting the Museum Ludwig in Cologne.                        

Straying around 10 (Jul, 2021)

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Straying around in the area of the Deutz harbor. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Straying around 9 (Jul, 2021)

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Straying around in the area around the autonomous center in Cologne. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Straying around 8 (Jun, 2021)

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Straying around in Ehrenfeld this time.Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Straying around 7 (May, 2021)

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At the wholesale market in Cologne again. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Straying around 6 (May, 2021)

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Straying around the streets in May, part 2. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Straying around 5 (May, 2021)

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Straying around the streets in May, part 1. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Straying around 4 (Apr, 2021)

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Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Exploring Japanese tea (Apr, 2021)

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I recently started to explore Japanese tea.              

Easter (Apr, 2021)

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Easter 2021.                                                                            

Straying around 3 (Mar, 2021)

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Spontaneous Summer: In the last week of March there was an unexpected short period of sunny summer days. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Straying around 2 (Mar, 2021)

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Still straying on the streets. This time in Köln Deutz. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

Still(s) at home (Mar, 2021)

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Some still shots I took at home.                                    

Straying around 1 (Mar, 2021)

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The constant repetition in a never-ending Corona-lockdown for a year now…can’t stop us from straying on the streets. Straying around is a loose series of walks through Cologne (mostly) during the Corona pandemic.

First snaps from 2021

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The first snaps I took in 2021.                                      

Trip to Berlin (Okt, 2020)

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A trip to Berlin in October 2020.                                  

Trip to the Eifel (Sep, 2020)

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A trip to a small Eifel village in September.          

Museum for East Asian Art (Jul, 2020)

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A visit to the Museum for East Asian Art in Cologne in July.

Summer 2020 in a nutshell (Jun, 2020)

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This summer has been one of the best I’ve ever had.

Social Distancing 10 (May, 2020)

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Social distancing (at the beginning of May).            

Social Distancing 9 (May, 2020)

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Social distancing (at the beginning of May).            

Social Distancing 8 (Apr, 2020)

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Social distancing end of April in Cologne.                

Cologne wholesale market (Jun, 2020)

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Straying around at the wholesale market in Cologne.

Social Distancing 7 (Apr, 2020)

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Social distancing in the mid of April in Cologne.  

Flora (May, 2020)

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A visit to the botanical garden Flora in Cologne after the first Corona lockdown.

Social Distancing 6 (Apr, 2020)

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A Friday night under social distancing (April 2020).

Social Distancing 5 (Mar/Apr, 2020)

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Here are some more impressions I captured during the Corona lockdown and the still on-going social distancing (March/April, 2020).

Social Distancing 4 (Mar/Apr, 2020)

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Social distancing continued (March/April, 2020)… (including snaps of this year’s cherry blossom in Cologne)

Social Distancing 3 (Mar/Apr, 2020)

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The third part of my on-going ‘Social Distancing’ series (March/April, 2020).

Social Distancing 2 (Mar, 2020)

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Social Distancing continued (March 2020)…              

Social Distancing 1 (Mar, 2020)

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Exploring our new normal under the impression of social distancing and the lockdown of public life (March 2020).

Trip to Wuppertal (Mar, 2020)

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Some snaps from a trip to Wuppertal in March. It was the last one right before the Corona lockdown in Germany.

Karneval Westum (Feb, 2021)

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The Carnival parade in Westum 2020                                

Geisterzug 2020 (Feb, 2020)

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This was the Geisterzug 2020                                        

IMM Cologne (Jan, 2020)

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Snaps from the International Furniture Fair (Internationale Möbelmesse, IMM) in Cologne.

New Year’s Eve 2019

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This was the New Year’s Eve 2020 in Cologne.            

Trip to Dresden (Oct, 2019)

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Snaps from a trip to Dresden in October 2019            

Cologne Pride Parade (Jul, 2019)

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The Cologne Pride Parade 2019                                      

Vogelsang – Place of responsibility (Jul, 2019)

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A trip to the documentation center Vogelsang IP.

Random Thoughts (Dec, 2018)

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Just some random snaps I put together as the end of 2018 is approaching.

A Weekend (Aug, 2018)

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Some random weekend souvenirs.                                        

Total lunar eclipse (Jul, 2018)

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The total lunar eclipse from July 27, 2018.              

Ölbergfest Wuppertal (Jul, 2020)

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This was the Ölbergfest in Wuppertal 2018.            

From London to April (Jan-Apr, 2018)

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Diary excerpt from January to April 2018. Contains trips to London, Berlin and several random shots.

Geisterzug 2018 (Feb, 2018)

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This was the Geisterzug 2018                                        

The nights in Cologne are loud

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The Weekend Stories continue and here is the next one: a loose collection of snaps I took during various party nights in the last couple of months.

Kitsch Museum in Bucharest (Okt, 2017)

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A visit to the Romanian Kitsch Museun in Bucharest, Romania.

A conferences in Bucharest (Okt, 2017)

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Another excerpt of my Conferences series. This time: Bucharest, Romania.

The making of ‘Dissolve’ (Sep, 2017)

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The making of Dissolve                                                    

‘Dissolve’ exhibition (Sep, 2017)

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The Dissolve exhibition by Keanu Sapadi.                

Trip to Vienna (Sep, 2017))

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Lost and Found: A day-trip to Vienna in 2017.          

The House Party (Sep, 2017)

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A new Weekend Story is online! Snaps of a house party that ended in the pubs of Cologne.

Timisoara’s Communist Consumer Museum (Aug, 2016)

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A visit to the Communist Consumer Museum in Timisoara, Romania.

Trip to Timisoara (Aug, 2017)

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A trip to Timisoara, Romania.                                          

Cologne Pride Parade (Jul, 2017)

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The Cologne Pride Parade 2017                                      

Ehe für alle (Jun, 2017)

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After years of discrimination, the German parliament legalized same-sex marriage this morning. Here are some impressions from the streets of Cologne that day.

The streets of Cologne (Jun, 2017)

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New Weekend Story.                                                            

Geisterzug (Mar, 2017)

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This was the Geisterzug 2017                                        

New Year’s Eve 2016

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This was the New Year’s Eve 2017 in Cologne.            

Die Mauer – A Cologne summer story (Sep, 2016)

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Some shots I took this summer.                                        

Kunstmuseum Bonn (Aug, 2016)

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A visit to the Kunstmuseum in Bonn.                          

Ölbergfest in Wuppertal (May, 2016)

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This was the Ölberfest in Wuppertal 2016                

Cologne’s Südstadt (May, 2016)

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This Weekend Story is about a trip to the Südtsadt in Cologne

Geisterzug (Mar, 2016)

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This was the Geisterzug 2016                                        

The dolls are in the doll’s house! (Apr, 2016)

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A new Weekend Stories chapter.                                    

Saturday Night Vibes (Mar, 2016)

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Another chapter of the ongoing Weekend Story series

New Year’s Eve 2015

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Impressions of the New Year’s Eve 2016.                      

A conferences in Washington, DC (Nov, 2015)

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I’m sitting at the hotel bar, spending my last night in Washington, DC.

Cologne Pride Parade (Jul, 2015)

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This was the Cologne Pride Parade 2015                    

Let’s Play Together (May, 2015)

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A short documentation of a playful evening.              

Evolution of a Saturday Night (Apr, 2015)

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Photographic documentation of last Saturday night.

New Year’s Eve 2014

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Some snaps of the New Year’s Eve 2015.                        

Stacy Crowne concert (Sep, 2014)

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This was the Stacy Crowne concert at the Flanigan’s in Cologne

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